This site is intended for healthcare professionals only

DiabetesontheNet Logo
×

Diabetes &
Primary Care

Issue:

Share this article
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on email
Share on print

Diabetes Distilled: Retinopathy differentiates nephropathy type but not severity in diabetes

Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the most common microvascular complication of diabetes. Researchers wanted to discover whether DR had utility in distinguishing another microvascular complication, diabetic nephropathy (DN), from non-diabetic nephropathy disease (NDRD). Investigators analysed 45 studies that evaluated DR for the diagnosis of DN in patients with type 2 diabetes and kidney disease. They found that DR helped differentiate DN from NDRD but the diagnostic accuracy of the test was not as high as expected. Researchers also found that the severity of DR might not parallel the presence of DN.

By Colin Kenny, Editor – Diabetes Distilled
 
Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the most common microvascular complication of diabetes. Researchers wanted to discover whether DR had utility in distinguishing another microvascular complication, diabetic nephropathy (DN), from non-diabetic nephropathy disease (NDRD). Investigators analysed 45 studies that evaluated DR for the diagnosis of DN in patients with type 2 diabetes and kidney disease. They found that DR helped differentiate DN from NDRD but the diagnostic accuracy of the test was not as high as expected. Researchers also found that the severity of DR might not parallel the presence of DN.
 
Investigators performed a comprehensive meta-analysis of all published studies comparing DR that used histopathological examination in the diagnosis of DN. They searched all relevant databases. Their analysis included patients with type 2 diabetes; they assessed the accuracy of DR for differentiation between patients with DN and those with NDRD; and they also analysed pathological evaluations of renal biopsy specimens.
 
The investigators identified 45 relevant studies that included a total of 4561 patients with type 2 diabetes and kidney disease in which biopsy specimens were also routinely processed. They found DR helped differentiate DN from NDRD, although the test had a sensitivity of 0.67 and specificity of 0.78, which was lower than may have been expected. When compared to DR, proliferative DR – which is the most severe form of the condition – was found to be a poor measure of diagnostic performance despite having a very high specificity for the diagnosis of DN (0.99). This finding suggests that, in patients with type 2 diabetes, there may be no equivalent relationship between DR severity and the presence of DN.
 
 To access the publication, click here

Share this article
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email
Share on whatsapp
For the latest news and articles

Sign up to all DiabetesontheNet journals

© Copyright Omniamed Communications. All Rights Reserved​
108 Cannon Street, London, EC4N 6EU. Registered in the United Kingdom​
Omniamed logo white
DiabetesontheNet Logo
For the latest news and articles

Sign up to all DiabetesontheNet journals

 

By clicking ‘Subscribe’, you are agreeing that DiabetesontheNet.com are able to email you periodic newsletters. You may unsubscribe from these at any time. Your info is safe with us and we will never sell or trade your details. For information please review our Privacy Policy.

DiabetesontheNet Logo

This website is for UK healthcare professionals only. To continue, please confirm that you are a UK healthcare professional below.