This site is intended for healthcare professionals only
News
Share this article

Behavioural intervention leads to long-term increases in activity

By Colin Kenny, Editor – Diabetes Distilled

Investigators wanted to discover whether positive changes in physical activity and a decrease in sedentary behaviour could be maintained over time in people with type 2 diabetes. They randomised 300 inactive and sedentary patients with type 2 diabetes to receive a behavioural intervention or standard care and followed them for an average of 3 years. Significant between-group differences in favour of the behavioural intervention were maintained throughout the study. The investigators felt that a behavioural intervention could lead to a sustained increase in physical activity and reduction in sedentary time.
 
The Italian Diabetes and Exercise Study 2 (IDES-2) was conducted in three outpatient diabetes clinics in Rome to investigate whether changes in activity levels and sedentary behaviour could be maintained over time. Physically inactive and sedentary patients with type 2 diabetes were randomised to receive a behavioural intervention (n=150) or standard care (n=150) for 3 years. The behavioural intervention consisted of an individual theoretical counselling session followed by eight individual biweekly theoretical and practical counselling sessions each year. Participants in the standard care group received treatment recommended by their GP.
 
The participants had a mean age of 61.6 years and were followed-up for a median of 3 years. There were significant differences in the volumes of light and moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity undertaken by the two groups (P<0.001), which were maintained throughout the study, although the between-group difference in moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity decreased from 6.5 min/day to 3.6 min/day during the final year of the study. The investigators felt that, compared with standard care, a behavioural intervention strategy could increase physical activity and decrease sedentary time in people with type 2 diabetes. To access the publication, click here 
 

Related content
Prevention of diabetic maculopathy: Trial of oral medication begins
;
Free for all UK & Ireland healthcare professionals

Sign up to all DiabetesontheNet journals

 

By clicking ‘Subscribe’, you are agreeing that DiabetesontheNet.com are able to email you periodic newsletters. You may unsubscribe from these at any time. Your info is safe with us and we will never sell or trade your details. For information please review our Privacy Policy.

Are you a healthcare professional? This website is for healthcare professionals only. To continue, please confirm that you are a healthcare professional below.

We use cookies responsibly to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your browser settings, we’ll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies on this website. Read about how we use cookies.