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Journal of
Diabetes Nursing

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The Link: Vol 16 No 7

NICE
On 12 July NICE released new guidance on identifying people at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes and the provision of clinically and cost-effective interventions to help reduce the risk or delay the onset of the condition. 

Professor Mike Kelly, Director of the Centre for Public Health Excellence at NICE said: “Type 2 diabetes is a very large-scale problem and it is important for people to know that it is preventable, and there are simple steps that can be taken to help reduce the risk of developing the disease. This guidance will help people to identify their own personal risk and highlights that by losing weight, being more active and improving their diet, they can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes.”

For further information on the new guidance visit http://nice.org.uk/PH38.

Diabetes UK
A new competition is inviting young people aged 16–25 years to design and test internet and mobile phone applications (“apps”), which will help people with diabetes get the most out of their healthcare appointments. The “Diabetes app challenge” is part of a research project, funded by Diabetes UK, which aims to identify how young people with the condition can receive more effective care. 

Researchers organising the competition believe that modern technology already in the hands of young people could help them to interact more effectively with healthcare professionals in a way that suits them. Lead investigator, Professor Jonathan Pinkney of Peninsula Medical School, said: “We hope that this competition will lead the way for apps that can improve young people’s confidence, helping them to set the agenda in consultations and allowing them to focus on the things they want to discuss that are important to them.”

Shortlisted apps will be made available online to young people with diabetes for testing at their next care appointment. Designers of the shortlisted apps will receive a payment every time someone downloads their app, and the most successful apps will go on to inform future research on diabetes self-management for young people.

The competition closing date is 14 October 2012. For more information on how to apply, visit: www.diabetesappchallenge.org.uk. The website includes a forum where young people thinking of entering can have their questions answered.

NHS Diabetes
NHS Diabetes is staging the first ever national “hypo awareness week”. The week is scheduled to run from 13–19 August and aims to raise awareness and in turn reduce incidents of hypoglycaemia in secondary care.

Trusts in England will be encouraged to hold activities and training, ensure they have fully-stocked “hypo kits” on their wards and that all staff (including receptionists) are aware of the symptoms of a “hypo” and what to do in the event of one. A pack of materials is being compiled and will be sent to trusts electronically, containing items including articles prepared for trust newsletters, presentations and screensavers. Invitations to take part will be sent to every acute hospital shortly.

The timeframe has been designed to coincide with the launch of the NHS Diabetes “safe management of hypoglycaemia” e-learning module released in July, which is designed to improve healthcare professionals’ knowledge and confidence in the safe and effective management of hypoglycaemia, as well as reducing the number of individuals who experience a “hypo”. 

If you would like your trust to take part in “hypo awareness week”, please register your interest by emailing: ursula.anderson@diabetes.nhs.uk.

NICE
On 12 July NICE released new guidance on identifying people at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes and the provision of clinically and cost-effective interventions to help reduce the risk or delay the onset of the condition. 

Professor Mike Kelly, Director of the Centre for Public Health Excellence at NICE said: “Type 2 diabetes is a very large-scale problem and it is important for people to know that it is preventable, and there are simple steps that can be taken to help reduce the risk of developing the disease. This guidance will help people to identify their own personal risk and highlights that by losing weight, being more active and improving their diet, they can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes.”

For further information on the new guidance visit http://nice.org.uk/PH38.

Diabetes UK
A new competition is inviting young people aged 16–25 years to design and test internet and mobile phone applications (“apps”), which will help people with diabetes get the most out of their healthcare appointments. The “Diabetes app challenge” is part of a research project, funded by Diabetes UK, which aims to identify how young people with the condition can receive more effective care. 

Researchers organising the competition believe that modern technology already in the hands of young people could help them to interact more effectively with healthcare professionals in a way that suits them. Lead investigator, Professor Jonathan Pinkney of Peninsula Medical School, said: “We hope that this competition will lead the way for apps that can improve young people’s confidence, helping them to set the agenda in consultations and allowing them to focus on the things they want to discuss that are important to them.”

Shortlisted apps will be made available online to young people with diabetes for testing at their next care appointment. Designers of the shortlisted apps will receive a payment every time someone downloads their app, and the most successful apps will go on to inform future research on diabetes self-management for young people.

The competition closing date is 14 October 2012. For more information on how to apply, visit: www.diabetesappchallenge.org.uk. The website includes a forum where young people thinking of entering can have their questions answered.

NHS Diabetes
NHS Diabetes is staging the first ever national “hypo awareness week”. The week is scheduled to run from 13–19 August and aims to raise awareness and in turn reduce incidents of hypoglycaemia in secondary care.

Trusts in England will be encouraged to hold activities and training, ensure they have fully-stocked “hypo kits” on their wards and that all staff (including receptionists) are aware of the symptoms of a “hypo” and what to do in the event of one. A pack of materials is being compiled and will be sent to trusts electronically, containing items including articles prepared for trust newsletters, presentations and screensavers. Invitations to take part will be sent to every acute hospital shortly.

The timeframe has been designed to coincide with the launch of the NHS Diabetes “safe management of hypoglycaemia” e-learning module released in July, which is designed to improve healthcare professionals’ knowledge and confidence in the safe and effective management of hypoglycaemia, as well as reducing the number of individuals who experience a “hypo”. 

If you would like your trust to take part in “hypo awareness week”, please register your interest by emailing: ursula.anderson@diabetes.nhs.uk.

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