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Journal of
Diabetes Nursing

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The Link: Vol 16 No 5

NHS DIabetes
A commitment to improving access to insulin pumps for people with diabetes was made by more than 70 healthcare professionals who came together for the National Insulin Pump Network Launch Event held at the Royal College of Physicians, London, on 3 May 2012. Dr Peter Hammond, Consultant Diabetologist, Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust, is the network’s clinical lead.

Following presentations setting the scene for current insulin pump therapy provision in England, delegates were split into regional groups and asked to consider a model for the network. A work programme will be developed for the year ahead based on the feedback from the event. Further information can be obtained from: http://www.diabetes.nhs.uk/networks/insulin_pump_network.

X-PERT Health
A diabetes charity has launched a new programme to help people at risk of type 2 diabetes from developing the condition, after predictions that a diabetes “pandemic” could reach 1 in 10 adults in the UK by 2030.

X-PERT Health’s Prevention of Diabetes (X-POD) programme will help people with impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance or a raised diabetes risk score to reduce their risk of developing type 2 diabetes, ideally preventing it completely.

The 6-week education course encourages participants to adopt a healthier diet and increase physical activity, as well as heightening awareness of the effects their lifestyles can have on their health.

Dr Trudi Deakin, Chief Executive of X-PERT Health, said: “X-POD will be offered free of charge through the NHS to anyone at risk of developing type 2 diabetes – for healthcare bodies, it is a cost-effective education programme that could reverse the type 2 diabetes prevalence statistics and transform the health of the nation.” The charity estimates that its programme could save the NHS up to £367 million each year.

For more information about X-POD, visit http://www.xperthealth.org.uk.

Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry
Researchers from the Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry have reviewed the NICE policy to screen those with diabetes annually for diabetic retinopathy; they found that for people with type 2 diabetes who have not been diagnosed with the condition, screening could safely be extended to once every 2 years without having an adverse effect on outcomes. The research shows that this could result in a saving of around 25% on screening costs within the NHS.

For further information contact Dr Daniel Chalk (daniel.chalk@pcmd.ac.uk).

Diabetes UK
A report from Diabetes UK warns that diabetes care in England has drifted into a “state of crisis”, where less than half of people with the condition are getting the basic minimum care they need. According to the State of the Nation 2012, published by Diabetes UK, there are some areas where just 6% of people with diabetes are getting the regular checks and services recommended by NICE. Not getting these checks has helped fuel a rise in rates of diabetes-related complications, which account for about 80% of NHS spending on diabetes and constitute one of the main reasons why treating diabetes costs a tenth of the entire NHS budget.

According to the report, the government urgently needs to introduce more effective risk assessment and early diagnosis, and to ensure that all people with diabetes have access to education and support for effective self-management to minimise complications. For further details visit http://www.diabetesonthenet.com/news.

NHS DIabetes
A commitment to improving access to insulin pumps for people with diabetes was made by more than 70 healthcare professionals who came together for the National Insulin Pump Network Launch Event held at the Royal College of Physicians, London, on 3 May 2012. Dr Peter Hammond, Consultant Diabetologist, Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust, is the network’s clinical lead.

Following presentations setting the scene for current insulin pump therapy provision in England, delegates were split into regional groups and asked to consider a model for the network. A work programme will be developed for the year ahead based on the feedback from the event. Further information can be obtained from: http://www.diabetes.nhs.uk/networks/insulin_pump_network.

X-PERT Health
A diabetes charity has launched a new programme to help people at risk of type 2 diabetes from developing the condition, after predictions that a diabetes “pandemic” could reach 1 in 10 adults in the UK by 2030.

X-PERT Health’s Prevention of Diabetes (X-POD) programme will help people with impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance or a raised diabetes risk score to reduce their risk of developing type 2 diabetes, ideally preventing it completely.

The 6-week education course encourages participants to adopt a healthier diet and increase physical activity, as well as heightening awareness of the effects their lifestyles can have on their health.

Dr Trudi Deakin, Chief Executive of X-PERT Health, said: “X-POD will be offered free of charge through the NHS to anyone at risk of developing type 2 diabetes – for healthcare bodies, it is a cost-effective education programme that could reverse the type 2 diabetes prevalence statistics and transform the health of the nation.” The charity estimates that its programme could save the NHS up to £367 million each year.

For more information about X-POD, visit http://www.xperthealth.org.uk.

Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry
Researchers from the Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry have reviewed the NICE policy to screen those with diabetes annually for diabetic retinopathy; they found that for people with type 2 diabetes who have not been diagnosed with the condition, screening could safely be extended to once every 2 years without having an adverse effect on outcomes. The research shows that this could result in a saving of around 25% on screening costs within the NHS.

For further information contact Dr Daniel Chalk (daniel.chalk@pcmd.ac.uk).

Diabetes UK
A report from Diabetes UK warns that diabetes care in England has drifted into a “state of crisis”, where less than half of people with the condition are getting the basic minimum care they need. According to the State of the Nation 2012, published by Diabetes UK, there are some areas where just 6% of people with diabetes are getting the regular checks and services recommended by NICE. Not getting these checks has helped fuel a rise in rates of diabetes-related complications, which account for about 80% of NHS spending on diabetes and constitute one of the main reasons why treating diabetes costs a tenth of the entire NHS budget.

According to the report, the government urgently needs to introduce more effective risk assessment and early diagnosis, and to ensure that all people with diabetes have access to education and support for effective self-management to minimise complications. For further details visit http://www.diabetesonthenet.com/news.

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