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Tesco to launch new “traffic light” food labelling system

Tesco will launch a new food labelling system in a bid to help people make healthy food choices, and to help those with type 1 and 2 diabetes to manage their condition.

The new food labels will use the characteristic “traffic light” colour-coded consumption advice. All food labels will also feature percentage guideline daily amounts.

Diabetes UK Chief Executive, Barbara Young, commented: “We welcome this move because evidence shows that the traffic light system works to help shoppers make healthy choices when buying food.” She added, “This could be an important milestone in the effort to reduce the number of people in the UK who are overweight or obese.”

The Independent, 23 August 2012

Dark chocolate: Treat yourself and your blood pressure?
According to new research, treating yourself to a few squares of dark chocolate each day may help to lower your blood pressure. It is thought that flavanols, the chemicals in cocoa, relax blood vessels by producing nitric oxide.

An analysis of 20 studies found that daily consumption of dark chocolate resulted in a slight reduction in blood pressure. Lead Researcher, Karin Ried, said, “Although we don’t yet have evidence for any sustained decrease in blood pressure, the small reduction we saw over the short term might complement other treatment options and contribute to reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.”

BBC News, 15 August 2012

Statin benefits outweigh the risk of developing diabetes
The benefits of statin therapy on cardiovascular  health outweigh the associated risk of developing T2D, new research suggests. 

Researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA reported that in people who were not at risk of developing T2D, statin therapy reduced cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk by 52% and had no effect of T2D risk. In individuals with T2D risk, statins reduced CVD risk by 30% and the risk of mortality by 17%.

Researcher, Professor Ridker, commented: “Our results show that in participants with and without diabetes risk, the absolute benefits of statin therapy are greater than the hazards of developing diabetes.”

The Telegraph, 10 August 2012

Weight-lifting can reduce T2D risk in men
Men who weight-train regularly can cut their risk of T2D by a third, according to new research.

Researchers from the Havard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA and the University of Southern Denmark followed 32000 men for 18 years. They found that men who weight-trained for 150 minutes per week reduced their risk of T2D by a third, and by 59% if combined with weekly aerobic exercise.

Senior study author Professor Frank Hu, said, “This study provides clear evidence that weight training has beneficial effects on diabetes risk over and above aerobic exercise, which are likely to be mediated through increased muscle mass and improved insulin sensitivity.”

The Telegraph, 7 August 2012

“To brie…or not to brie…”
Regularly snacking on cheese could cut the risk of developing T2D by 12%, new research suggests. 

The findings, from one of the largest ever studies to investigate the role of diet in health, were published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 

However, obesity is another risk factor for diabetes and cheese is high in saturated fat. The researchers commented, “This study gives us no reason to believe that people should change their dairy intake in an attempt to avoid the condition.” 

The Telegraph, 24 July 2012

Commercial pilots with diabetes will be allowed to fly
Licensed pilots with diabetes will now be allowed to fly commercial aircraft, according to an announcement by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA). The CAA have also ruled that air traffic controllers with diabetes will now be able to carry out full operational duties. 

Prior to gaining the appropriate medical qualification, pilots and air traffic controllers will need to show that they are managing their diabetes and associated complications.

Barbara Young, Chief Executive of Diabetes UK, said, “The CAA has rightly acknowledged that advances in the management of diabetes, along with the appropriate level of testing and monitoring, ensure that safety standards are maintained.”

Diabetes UK News, 31 August 2012

Tesco will launch a new food labelling system in a bid to help people make healthy food choices, and to help those with type 1 and 2 diabetes to manage their condition.

The new food labels will use the characteristic “traffic light” colour-coded consumption advice. All food labels will also feature percentage guideline daily amounts.

Diabetes UK Chief Executive, Barbara Young, commented: “We welcome this move because evidence shows that the traffic light system works to help shoppers make healthy choices when buying food.” She added, “This could be an important milestone in the effort to reduce the number of people in the UK who are overweight or obese.”

The Independent, 23 August 2012

Dark chocolate: Treat yourself and your blood pressure?
According to new research, treating yourself to a few squares of dark chocolate each day may help to lower your blood pressure. It is thought that flavanols, the chemicals in cocoa, relax blood vessels by producing nitric oxide.

An analysis of 20 studies found that daily consumption of dark chocolate resulted in a slight reduction in blood pressure. Lead Researcher, Karin Ried, said, “Although we don’t yet have evidence for any sustained decrease in blood pressure, the small reduction we saw over the short term might complement other treatment options and contribute to reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.”

BBC News, 15 August 2012

Statin benefits outweigh the risk of developing diabetes
The benefits of statin therapy on cardiovascular  health outweigh the associated risk of developing T2D, new research suggests. 

Researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA reported that in people who were not at risk of developing T2D, statin therapy reduced cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk by 52% and had no effect of T2D risk. In individuals with T2D risk, statins reduced CVD risk by 30% and the risk of mortality by 17%.

Researcher, Professor Ridker, commented: “Our results show that in participants with and without diabetes risk, the absolute benefits of statin therapy are greater than the hazards of developing diabetes.”

The Telegraph, 10 August 2012

Weight-lifting can reduce T2D risk in men
Men who weight-train regularly can cut their risk of T2D by a third, according to new research.

Researchers from the Havard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA and the University of Southern Denmark followed 32000 men for 18 years. They found that men who weight-trained for 150 minutes per week reduced their risk of T2D by a third, and by 59% if combined with weekly aerobic exercise.

Senior study author Professor Frank Hu, said, “This study provides clear evidence that weight training has beneficial effects on diabetes risk over and above aerobic exercise, which are likely to be mediated through increased muscle mass and improved insulin sensitivity.”

The Telegraph, 7 August 2012

“To brie…or not to brie…”
Regularly snacking on cheese could cut the risk of developing T2D by 12%, new research suggests. 

The findings, from one of the largest ever studies to investigate the role of diet in health, were published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 

However, obesity is another risk factor for diabetes and cheese is high in saturated fat. The researchers commented, “This study gives us no reason to believe that people should change their dairy intake in an attempt to avoid the condition.” 

The Telegraph, 24 July 2012

Commercial pilots with diabetes will be allowed to fly
Licensed pilots with diabetes will now be allowed to fly commercial aircraft, according to an announcement by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA). The CAA have also ruled that air traffic controllers with diabetes will now be able to carry out full operational duties. 

Prior to gaining the appropriate medical qualification, pilots and air traffic controllers will need to show that they are managing their diabetes and associated complications.

Barbara Young, Chief Executive of Diabetes UK, said, “The CAA has rightly acknowledged that advances in the management of diabetes, along with the appropriate level of testing and monitoring, ensure that safety standards are maintained.”

Diabetes UK News, 31 August 2012

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