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Put a lid on it: Sugary soft drinks linked to T2D incidence

Drinking one can of sugar-sweetened drink per day could increase a person’s risk of developing T2D, according to an analysis performed by researchers at Imperial College London.

The study, which investigated if fruit juice and soft drink consumption was associated with an increased incidence of T2D, examined the drinking habits of 30 000 European adults from eight countries.

Consuming 12 oz (336 mL) of sugar-sweetened beverage, which is equivalent to just one can of soft drink, was found to increase the risk of T2D by 22%, even after adjusting for variables such as BMI and energy intake. However, daily consumption of fruit juice or artificially sweetened drinks was not associated with an elevated diabetes risk. Further investigation is needed to determine if sugary drinks cause a rise in diabetes risk because of their effect on weight gain, or because of their high glycaemic index, which can lead to insulin resistance.

– BBC News, 25 April

Missing the target? Four in five miss treatment targets
Diabetes UK has announced that only one in five people are achieving adequate diabetes control. New data from the National Diabetes Audit reveal that just 19.9% of people with diabetes in England are able to meet the recommended targets for blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol. Figures were even lower in people with T1D, with only 11.5% of people meeting treatment targets. 

Diabetes UK announced these figures at the start of a new campaign promoting self-management through structured education and planning, with the aim of reducing preventable complications and improving the well-being of people with diabetes.

– The Times, 2 April 2013

Unhealthy lifestyles could be causing T2D in under 40s
Cases of newly diagnosed T2D have risen from 217 per 100 000 people between 1996–2000 to 598 per 100 000 people between 2006–2010, according to research from the University of Cardiff.

With the greatest increase in those under  the age of 40, experts have warned that earlier onset may increase the risk of diabetes-related complications, decrease quality of life and intensify the financial burden on the NHS. Unhealthy lifestyles are thought to have caused the surge in T2D prevalence.

Natasha Marsland, Diabetes UK clinical adviser, said: “The good news is that everyone can reduce their risk by maintaining a healthy weight and being regularly physically active.”

– Daily Express, 18 May 2013

Air pollutants could increase the risk of T2D in children
New research from Helmholtz Zentrum, Munich show that children exposed to high levels of air pollutants such as nitrogen dioxide have an increased risk of developing insulin resistance (IR), a precursor of T2D.

Blood samples from 397 children were analysed in the study. It was found that living 500 m closer to a main road increased the risk of IR by 7%.

Previous research suggests that women living in polluted areas give birth to low birth weight babies, which is an independent risk factor for T2D. Another explanation is that pollutants could cause cell damage or inflammation, leading to IR. A 15-year follow-up of participating children is planned.

– The Telegraph, 9 May 2013

Implementation plan: MPs call for better diabetes care
Members of the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Diabetes have called for government action to improve diabetes healthcare following the publication of their most recent report.

The report proposes a national plan for improved healthcare across England and appeals for increased government funding to support research into T1D.

Torbay MP Adrian Sanders, chairman of the group, said: “Diabetes is one of the greatest challenges we face yet diabetes healthcare is poor, patchy and expensive, and too many people with the condition are not getting the care or support they desperately need.”

– Evening Standard, 20 March 2013

Drinking one can of sugar-sweetened drink per day could increase a person’s risk of developing T2D, according to an analysis performed by researchers at Imperial College London.

The study, which investigated if fruit juice and soft drink consumption was associated with an increased incidence of T2D, examined the drinking habits of 30 000 European adults from eight countries.

Consuming 12 oz (336 mL) of sugar-sweetened beverage, which is equivalent to just one can of soft drink, was found to increase the risk of T2D by 22%, even after adjusting for variables such as BMI and energy intake. However, daily consumption of fruit juice or artificially sweetened drinks was not associated with an elevated diabetes risk. Further investigation is needed to determine if sugary drinks cause a rise in diabetes risk because of their effect on weight gain, or because of their high glycaemic index, which can lead to insulin resistance.

– BBC News, 25 April

Missing the target? Four in five miss treatment targets
Diabetes UK has announced that only one in five people are achieving adequate diabetes control. New data from the National Diabetes Audit reveal that just 19.9% of people with diabetes in England are able to meet the recommended targets for blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol. Figures were even lower in people with T1D, with only 11.5% of people meeting treatment targets. 

Diabetes UK announced these figures at the start of a new campaign promoting self-management through structured education and planning, with the aim of reducing preventable complications and improving the well-being of people with diabetes.

– The Times, 2 April 2013

Unhealthy lifestyles could be causing T2D in under 40s
Cases of newly diagnosed T2D have risen from 217 per 100 000 people between 1996–2000 to 598 per 100 000 people between 2006–2010, according to research from the University of Cardiff.

With the greatest increase in those under  the age of 40, experts have warned that earlier onset may increase the risk of diabetes-related complications, decrease quality of life and intensify the financial burden on the NHS. Unhealthy lifestyles are thought to have caused the surge in T2D prevalence.

Natasha Marsland, Diabetes UK clinical adviser, said: “The good news is that everyone can reduce their risk by maintaining a healthy weight and being regularly physically active.”

– Daily Express, 18 May 2013

Air pollutants could increase the risk of T2D in children
New research from Helmholtz Zentrum, Munich show that children exposed to high levels of air pollutants such as nitrogen dioxide have an increased risk of developing insulin resistance (IR), a precursor of T2D.

Blood samples from 397 children were analysed in the study. It was found that living 500 m closer to a main road increased the risk of IR by 7%.

Previous research suggests that women living in polluted areas give birth to low birth weight babies, which is an independent risk factor for T2D. Another explanation is that pollutants could cause cell damage or inflammation, leading to IR. A 15-year follow-up of participating children is planned.

– The Telegraph, 9 May 2013

Implementation plan: MPs call for better diabetes care
Members of the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Diabetes have called for government action to improve diabetes healthcare following the publication of their most recent report.

The report proposes a national plan for improved healthcare across England and appeals for increased government funding to support research into T1D.

Torbay MP Adrian Sanders, chairman of the group, said: “Diabetes is one of the greatest challenges we face yet diabetes healthcare is poor, patchy and expensive, and too many people with the condition are not getting the care or support they desperately need.”

– Evening Standard, 20 March 2013

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