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New evidence linking coffee consumption to reduced diabetes risk

It is known that people with a moderate coffee and tea consumption generally have a lower type 2 diabetes risk. In a new analysis, investigators examined how an increase in coffee consumption influenced the subsequent risk of developing the condition. They showed that increasing coffee consumption by on average one-and-a-half cups a day over a 4-year period reduced the risk of type 2 diabetes by 11% in the next 4-year period.

by Colin Kenny, GP, Dromore

In this analysis, observational data were examined from three large prospective studies: the Nurses’ Health Study; the Nurses’ Health Study II; and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. These studies contributed a combined 1,663,319 person-years of follow-up, during which 7269 cases of incident type 2 diabetes were documented. Diet has been prospectively assessed every 4 years using a validated food-frequency questionnaire, with data collection beginning in 1991 for the Nurses’ Health Study II cohort and 1986 in the other two cohorts.

Increasing caffeinated coffee consumption by on average one-and-a-half cups a day over a 4-year period reduced the risk of type 2 diabetes by 11% in the next 4-year period. Participants who decreased their coffee intake by more than a cup a day had a 17% higher risk of type 2 diabetes. Changes in tea consumption were not associated with modified type 2 diabetes risk.

In conclusion, the findings suggest that increasing coffee consumption over a 4-year period is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes during the next 4 years, while decreasing coffee consumption is associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes in the subsequent period.

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